The Old Knewton Blog

IESE MBA Forum starts today

leave a comment »

A quick note to say that IESE, the Spanish business school recently ranked #1 in the world by the Economist, is starting its high-profile MBA Career forum today. Why is IESE so special? The Economist cited graduates’ high salaries and employment rates, and the wide variety of job categories in which IESE graduates have made an impact, as the main reasons behind the rankings. Here’s a video that explains further.

Written by Knewton

October 26, 2009 at 9:50 PM

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with , , ,

Attitude problems

leave a comment »

Emily Holleman is a Content Developer at Knewton, helping students with their LSAT preparation.

If you read my friend Chris Black’s great post on passage wording last week, you already know how important language is on the LSAT. However, it’s especially important to pay attention to language use when you’re asked about an author’s attitude.

Attitude questions—you know, those pesky ones that pretty much ask you how the author feels about something—may be the trickiest questions on the Reading Comp section. If only those authors would just come out and say how they felt about the topic (I think that Yeats’ poetry is crap)! Luckily for us, these attitudes do come across loud and clear, as long as you know what types of language to look for.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Knewton

October 26, 2009 at 2:36 PM

Should all teachers post their syllabi and curricula online?

with one comment

Timothy Burke says in his blog post, “Putting Syllabi Online:”

Since I often put up both drafts of syllabi and completed syllabi for comments, I obviously think it’s a good practice. It’s been nothing but beneficial for me: I’ve gotten great suggestions, interesting critiques, a good feeling for how the syllabus plays with different intellectual communities. So why wouldn’t everyone do this? In fact, why shouldn’t everyone more or less be officially pushed to do it by colleagues or administrations. It’s not just a good thing for the person posting the syllabus, but for students who want an early view of what a course might entail and for larger publics who would like to get a sense of how much work and thought goes into an average course design. Since one of the handicaps academics have in the public sphere at the moment is that there are a number of people who think the work of college teaching consists of walking into a room, letting knowledge spill out of your head, and leaving, it might help if we gave a demonstration of what’s actually involved.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Knewton

October 22, 2009 at 10:08 PM

The September 2009 LSAT: Not All Tests Are Created Equal

leave a comment »

If you recently took the September 2009 LSAT, you may be wondering whether your test was any harder or easier than previous LSATs. Though it’s true that the LSAT varies slightly in difficulty from administration to administration, this variation will not affect your final score. Consider Jonas, a fictional law school hopeful who took the LSAT twice: once in June, 2008 and again in June, 2009. In June, 2008 Jonas correctly answered 86 out of the 101 scored questions on the test. When LSAC converted his raw score of 86 to the 120-180 point scale, he received a 165. In June, 2009 Jonas correctly answered only 83 of the 101 scored questions on the LSAT. His scaled score, however, remained the same – a 165. Because Jonas was able to earn the same scaled score by correctly answering fewer questions on the June 2009 test than the June 2008 test, we can say that the June 2009 test was “harder” by a margin of about 2-3%.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Knewton

October 19, 2009 at 3:00 PM

Processing

with 2 comments

Processing is an open source programming language and environment for people who want to code their own animation, interactions and data visualization. It shows tons of potential for fun, interactive educational and gaming applications. Check out the project gallery to see some examples, ranging from the silly to the sublime. Project initiators Ben Fry and Casey Reas say they made it “to teach fundamentals of computer programming within a visual context and to serve as a software sketchbook and professional production tool. Processing is an alternative to proprietary software tools in the same domain.”

Anthony Mattox has made some particularly compelling artworks with Processing:

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Knewton

October 16, 2009 at 7:55 PM

Business School Celebs

leave a comment »

Why should anyone go to business school? Bill Gates never went, and neither did Steve Jobs. But you know who did? All these people. They used business school to develop the tools they needed for real-world success. If you’re serious about business, maybe you should go too…

Starring Chris Black
Produced by Ian Parker

Written by Knewton

October 15, 2009 at 1:17 AM